Idols and Hollywood

sunisup:

I’m reading up on the Memoirs of a Geisha controversy, since I’d neither seen the movie nor read the book, and the more I read about it, the more pissed off I get.  Basically it went down like this:
Japanese woman tells white American man about her past life as a geisha.  White American man then writes a novel that sells itself as an accurate memoir of Japanese woman’s life, but instead falsifies a number of her life events, misrepresents her trade, and exoticises her culture.  He also names her as a source even though she specifically asked him to keep her anonymous.  Japanese woman gets death threats.  White American man becomes bestselling author.
Then Japanese woman gets fed up and writes her own memoir to set the record straight.  Meanwhile, white American man’s book gets adapted into a film that grosses $162 million and wins three Oscars.

Memoirs of a Geisha author Arthur Golden always said it was a fictionalised account with extra information and background information given by Mineko Iwasaki. Sayuri was not meant to be a version of Iwasaki.
Also I think I should also point out that Golden countered her claim of defamation by claiming that he had tapes of their conversation proving that she had admitted that the mizuage was a real tradition in Gion but, tellingly, never said anything about whether or not her claim that he should keep her name a secret was true. So that says a lot.
Iwasaki’s lawsuit was settled out of court so I think it’s fair to say that neither had a strong enough case to fully win/defend against the other.
Whatever really was true or not true neither party has backed down from their position of claiming they are in the right but neither has spoken about what happened in court either.
These stories are never as simple as they sound. View Larger

sunisup:

I’m reading up on the Memoirs of a Geisha controversy, since I’d neither seen the movie nor read the book, and the more I read about it, the more pissed off I get.  Basically it went down like this:

Japanese woman tells white American man about her past life as a geisha.  White American man then writes a novel that sells itself as an accurate memoir of Japanese woman’s life, but instead falsifies a number of her life events, misrepresents her trade, and exoticises her culture.  He also names her as a source even though she specifically asked him to keep her anonymous.  Japanese woman gets death threats.  White American man becomes bestselling author.

Then Japanese woman gets fed up and writes her own memoir to set the record straight.  Meanwhile, white American man’s book gets adapted into a film that grosses $162 million and wins three Oscars.

Memoirs of a Geisha author Arthur Golden always said it was a fictionalised account with extra information and background information given by Mineko Iwasaki. Sayuri was not meant to be a version of Iwasaki.

Also I think I should also point out that Golden countered her claim of defamation by claiming that he had tapes of their conversation proving that she had admitted that the mizuage was a real tradition in Gion but, tellingly, never said anything about whether or not her claim that he should keep her name a secret was true. So that says a lot.

Iwasaki’s lawsuit was settled out of court so I think it’s fair to say that neither had a strong enough case to fully win/defend against the other.

Whatever really was true or not true neither party has backed down from their position of claiming they are in the right but neither has spoken about what happened in court either.

These stories are never as simple as they sound.


sarah531:

Sometimes I wonder what Hugo was trying to say when he wrote Grantaire and his relationship with Enjolras (goddamn that novel, everything in its billion trillion pages was making a point)…

In a book where a lot of the characters are proper Heroes (with a capital H), willing to fight and die for things like freedom and justice, Grantaire’s not really that. He spends most of his page time drunkenly monologuing and then he manages to sleep through all the noble speechifying and glorious battles. He annoys people and he wastes his potential and his chosen nickname is just one letter. Spiritually, he’s about as low as you can get, except that he deeply loves, in whatever way, someone else.

Loves Enjolras so much, in fact, that he doesn’t want to live in a world without him- but also places him, and by default his ideals, so high above himself that he asks permission before getting in the way of his ‘fine death’.
Grantaire’s love is almost completely unselfish and that’s his redemption- Enjolras finally accepts him once he realises that the thing Grantaire was thinking, believing, willing, living and dying for was him.

So the point was, I think, “yeah, you can be cynical and depressive and a bit of a pain in the arse, but if you really love someone none of that matters, you’re worth something, you’re heroic.’ So that’s nice. I’m just gonna go cry now….

I love that that was the major theme of the novel and so it’s kinda why I get kinda sad that they made Éponine much more sympathetic in the stage musical.

In the book I really like how she is redeemed by her love for Marius and how Hugo believes so ardently in the power of love to make us better people. Éponine isn’t really that nice in the beginning just pitiable because her parents silly ways made them bankrupted and robbed her of her youth, but she was willing to scam and rob Jean and Cosette with her parents if she didn’t think that it would make Marius dislike her.

The cruelties of the street may have robbed her of her youth but it was love that gave her back her humanity in the harshest of situations.

Grantaire love for Enjolras is really sweet too like Grantaire saw in Enjolras as the perfect person he felt he wasn’t worthy of being. Like when someone self sabotages because they are scared for failing. However it was that death scene, after he sees that Enjolras is afraid of the pain of death just like him as they hid in the wine shop, that I think it turns in to romantic love.

Les Misérables is really a good book.


The Stars (Are Out Tonight) - David Bowie.

Starring Tilde Swinton as the Wife, Saskia De Brauw as Celebrity 2, Andrej Pejic as Celebrity 1, Iselin Steiro as the Vocalist, Yves Berlin as Guitar, Folake Olowofoyeku as Bass and Randy Michael as the Drums.

I loved the music video even if it freaked me out a bit. Also the model they got to play pseudo David (Iselin Steiro) was kinda perfect~!